Bird Families

Bush flycatcher

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The blackbird flycatcher, or Pitohui, is a songbird that lives in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea.

Each of us knows about the existence of poisonous snakes, spiders and even frogs, but have you ever heard that there are also poisonous birds? If not, let me introduce you to the pitoha, small bright birds native to Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. They represent a relatively recent scientific discovery, although the inhabitants of Papua New Guinea have long been familiar with these unusual feathered creatures. Please note that these birds do not have venomous fangs and stings.

At the moment, the pitochu is one of the three species of poisonous birds known in the world. In total, there are six species of pitohu, most of which are small in body size, about 23 cm, and are painted in bright warning colors. The most venomous of the six species is the bicolor blackbird flycatcher, or bicolor pytochu.

The discovery that poison is present in the body of the pito was purely by accident, when in 1992, a scientist named Jack Dumdakher was fishing for the study of birds of paradise. When he was disentangling a pittox from the nets, he scratched his finger, but instead of medical treatment, he put it in his mouth and immediately felt that his tongue and lips were numb. When this happened the first time, Jack Doomdacher was puzzled, but could not find any explanation for this. The incident was repeated a couple more times, and only then the scientific world learned about the existence of poisonous birds.

A reasonable question arises, so why is the two-colored pito poisonous?
It turns out that the internal organs, feathers and skin of the pytochu contain venom, which was found in slightly more famous tree frogs. This chemical is actually the most potent natural toxin known to man. For the most part, these birds will cause numbness and tingling, sneezing, chemical burns, and other minor symptoms when touched. Serious side effects such as paralysis and death can occur if you come into contact with large amounts of this poison. But this is with regards to humans, but small rodents, snakes, rabbits and frogs will no longer be lucky, certain death awaits them.

Further research has shown that other members of the pitokhu are also poisonous, but their toxicity varies depending on the habitat. In some cases, researchers will sneeze and show symptoms simply from being around the birds, while other times nothing will happen. This means that birds get their venom from external sources. Indeed, the poison comes from the food they eat, and in this case from the Choresine Melyrid beetles, which contain batrachotoxin in their bodies. In the course of evolution, the pitokhs themselves have developed immunity to it and do not experience any inconvenience.

Despite the fact that the locals are aware of the toxicity of pitohui, the natives of New Guinea eat them, although they take great care during the laborious preparation. Typically, the local population refers to the pitoja as a trash bird, in part because it gives off an unpleasant odor when cooked and tastes bitter. Some tribes in New Guinea believe that pitohuis can only be eaten after the proper mourning period for dead birds has elapsed.

It is likely that venomous birds have taken on this adaptation as a form of defense mechanism. Two-colored pitohui in particular seem to know they are not a delicacy and tend to be very loud and sociable, and are not afraid to stand out in numerous mixed flocks of birds. There is another added benefit that feather lice have little interest in toxic feathers and pito skin.


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Bush flycatcher

  • Blackbird bush flycatcher Bradornis infuscatus Smith, 1839
  • Ash bush flycatcher Bradornis microrhynchus Reichenow, 1887
  • Pale bush flycatcher Bradornis pallidus von Muller, 1851
  • Marikuy bush flycatcher Bradornis mariquensis Smith, 1847
  • Subfamily True flycatchers Muscicapinae Bush flycatchers Bradornis Smith, A 1847 Blue flycatchers Cyanoptila Blyth, 1847 Cyornis flycatchers Cyornis
  • flowing into the Chifumage River in the northern part of the park. There are also extensive miombo savanna forests similar to the basins of the Zambezi River in western Zambia. Territory
  • endemic for the country black-breasted larvae, browed jungle flycatcher Sarawak whistler, red-headed pitta one - occasional vagrant
  • Among the permanent inhabitants of the park are the gray-striped turach, the white-fronted gray flycatcher and the golden-backed velvet weaver, the small flamingo occasionally flies into the park
  • Siberian flycatcher Muscicapa sibirica Broad-billed flycatcher Muscicapa dauurica Red flycatcher Muscicapa ferruginea Pine flycatcher Ficedula
  • Yellow-backed flycatcher Ficedula narcissina - Japanese flycatcher Ficedula mugimaki - Taiga flycatcher or flycatcher - Mugimaki Ficedula parva - Lesser flycatcher Ficedula
  • Silver flycatcher Empidornis semipartitus Pale flycatcher Melaenornis pallidus Northern black flycatcher Melaenornis edolioides Gray flycatcher Muscicapa
  • Grasshopper Bunting, Ammodramus savannarum Baird's Bunting, Ammodramus bairdii Grasshopper Bunting, Ammodramus leconteii Grasshopper Bunting
  • climatic zones and human influence. The savanna fauna typical of modern East Africa, which prevailed in this region at the end of the Eocene and the beginning of the Pliocene
  • Julien Fran├žois Desjardins Eng. Julien Fran├žois Desjardins in Sawan County in 1826. It is in the collection of Mauritius founded by Desjardins
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila
  • Daito Islands Dark Reed Bush Bunting Red-eyed Cayman Thrush Great Amakiha Guam Flycatcher Hawaiian Akialoa Kauai Palila

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